The Worst Colleges In Each State That Aren’t Worth The Tuition Costs

When it comes to higher education, not all colleges and universities are deemed equal. In fact, there are a few around the country that aren’t worth the student loans and interest rates, such as Auburn University at Montgomery and Southern Connecticut State University. From less-than-average graduation percentages to nonexistent student life, here are the worst colleges in each state that aren’t worth the money.

Maine: The University Of Maine At Augusta

he University Of Maine At Augusta
Joe Phelan/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images
Joe Phelan/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

For incoming freshmen interested in diving into the University of Maine school system, there is no harm in skipping the Augusta campus. While the annual net price to attend school looks attractive at under $10,000, that’s pretty much all that’s good about this particular university.

Students can expect to leave school after four years with considerable debt. And if that wasn’t enough, interest rates for those loans tend to be around 16.8%, a substantial jump from the national average.

Arkansas: The University Of Arkansas At Little Rock

Little Rock
Jamie Schwaberow/NCAA Photos via Getty Images
Jamie Schwaberow/NCAA Photos via Getty Images

With a low graduation rate of 42%, the University of Arkansas at Little Rock probably isn’t worth an incoming freshman’s money. The average price to attend Little Rock is a solid $13,256, making the perspective debt after four years a staggering $27,112.

Considering the median income after six years of work is only $34,900, Little Rock graduates can assume they’ll be paying their student loans off for the foreseeable future.

Maryland: Frostburg State University

Frostburg State University
Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Students can expect to earn a solid salary after six years in the workforce with a degree from Frostburg State University in Maryland. First, they have to get through those four years. Only 47% of students end up graduating from this school and, considering how outdated it is, it’s not surprising.

From the classrooms to the dormitories, there isn’t much to look at, as the university hasn’t updated its campus in years. Add on the fact that there isn’t much to do in the surrounding town, and Frostburg drops off the “cool school” list.

Vermont: Goddard College

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Unsplash/Eliabe Costa
Unsplash/Eliabe Costa

Goddard College in Vermont might have a quaint and lovely campus, but prospective students have to keep in mind that there is a tiny student population of just 364. This means there is little to no campus and social life.

On top of that, the average net price to attend isn’t for the faint of heart. Students can expect to pay around $23,187 per year, and those who take out student loans can look forward to a hefty $31,452 debt upon graduation.

Deleware: Delaware Technical Community College – Terry

Delaware Technical Community College
Would If/Pinterest
Would If/Pinterest

A 100% acceptance rate might sound nice for those students who aren’t sure where they’ll be accepted out of high school. But when the graduation rate is a staggeringly low 14%, they might want to weigh their options and not attend Delaware Technical Community College, Terry.

Not only is the graduation rate pretty much nonexistent, but the post-graduate support looks to be in the same boat. One student wrote a review saying everything is on the student, with the faculty not really helping out.

Connecticut: Southern Connecticut State University

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Unsplash/Wes Hicks
Unsplash/Wes Hicks

Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, Connecticut, might be beautiful, but that natural beauty comes at a steep price. The annual net price to attend this university is a solid $17,389, giving students $26,936 worth of debt to look forward to after graduation.

Not only that, but many students have written reviews stating the professors aren’t the best around. One student wrote, “most of them [professors] felt like they didn’t care if you were even there or not.”

Rhode Island: Johnson & Wales University – Providence

Johnson & Wales University - Providence
Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

The state of Rhode Island is known to be a bit on the pricier side, and Johnson & Wales University in Providence is no different, asking for a whopping average net price of $28,089 per year. For students who make it through all four years, most likely taking out student loans during that time, they’re looking at a cringe-worthy debt of $36,804.

With those numbers in mind, it might be best for prospective student’s financial futures to look at higher education elsewhere.

Michigan: Henry Ford College

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Unsplash/Sincerely Media
Unsplash/Sincerely Media

Henry Ford College in Michigan has a staggeringly low annual net tuition price of $3,299, making it an attractive choice for locals. But, as one senior wrote, people are better off not attending college than attending Henry Ford.

While the acceptance rate is 100%, only 6% make it to graduation with a loan interest rate of 21.8% to look forward to. That senior might be on to something when they wrote not to attend this college.

California: Unitek College, Fremont

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Unsplash/Thought Catalog
Unsplash/Thought Catalog

Considering California takes up a majority of the western coast of the United States, there are many colleges to choose from. So, don’t settle for Unitek College – Fremont, a school that has a 100% acceptance rate and a student population of fewer than 4,000.

Ironically, the school advertises as a place of higher education that accepts everyone at a fair price. Too bad the price is well above the national average, at an average annual net price of $50,281.

Nevada: Sierra Nevada University

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Unsplash/David Kennedy
Unsplash/David Kennedy

Don’t let Sierra Nevada University’s scenic Lake Tahoe location fool prospective students; it’s not the best place to get a higher education. Not only is the average net price to attend around $30,352 per year, but students can expect a student loan debt of around $21,524 after graduation.

According to one freshman, for the price, the school isn’t worth it. In a review, they said, “I didn’t have any growth in my major and no room for growth otherwise.”

Florida: Florida Technical College, Orlando

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Unsplash/LinkedIn Sales Solutions
Unsplash/LinkedIn Sales Solutions

Florida Technical College is one of those schools that’s average with nothing overly exciting about it. Well, unless people credit excessive student loans and a horrible income six years into the workforce, “exciting.”

Graduating from Florida Technical College in Orlando, Florida, students can expect to make an average salary of $24,600 after paying an average of $15,442 per year. That salary is well below the national average and not nearly enough to live off of while trying to pay off student loans.

Georgia: Georgia Gwinnett College

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Unsplash/Siora Photography
Unsplash/Siora Photography

Georgia Gwinnett College in Georgia has a low tuition cost: an annual net price of $11,735, making it an attractive school for students who don’t feel like spending years after graduation paying off loans. But they shouldn’t let the low numbers fool them.

With a 100% acceptance rate, only 17% of students wind up walking in a cap and gown for graduation. Clearly, dropping out is a common occurrence. Then again, students are getting what they paid for, which, at the end of the day, obviously isn’t great.

Colorado: Pikes Peak Community College

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Unsplash/Tim Gouw
Unsplash/Tim Gouw

While community colleges are a great way to save money, Pikes Peak Community College in Colorado isn’t worth it. Yes, it is cheaper to attend than, say, Boulder or Denver, but, according to students, the faculty and overall atmosphere of the college are horrible.

In a review, one freshman wrote, “The attitude I got from the higher-ups … is that they couldn’t care less about me, my grades, my life, my hopes for a degree, nothing.”

North Carolina: The University Of North Carolina At Pembroke

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Unsplash/Steniar Engeland
Unsplash/Steniar Engeland

When it comes to the UNC system in North Carolina, the University of North Carolina at Pembroke doesn’t deliver. Yes, its average tuition price of $11,576 per year is low compared to other universities in the system, but that doesn’t mean the services are good.

In fact, one student has gone on record saying the faculty at the University of North Carolina Pembroke isn’t great and that it’s not worth the $22,368 student loan debt.

New York: SUNY Medgar Evers College

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Unsplash/Andrey Zvyagintsev
Unsplash/Andrey Zvyagintsev

City lovers will be happy to know that there are many colleges in New York, meaning they don’t have to settle for CUNY Medgar Evers College. While the average net price for tuition is a very low $6,677 per year, it doesn’t make up for the low percentage of people that actually graduate.

According to a former student, CUNY Medgar Evers College has unobtainable standards for its students, making their graduation rate 16% from its 90% acceptance.

South Carolina: Coastal Carolina University

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Unsplash/Element5 Digital
Unsplash/Element5 Digital

According to a former senior, after four years, no one particularly likes attending Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina aside from its fantastic Myrtle Beach location. That’s not exactly a selling feature, considering most people want to attend for education.

It also doesn’t help that the average net price to attend CCU is $16,368 per year, leaving students who take out loans looking at a debt of $37,692 after graduation. Ouch.

Arizona: Grand Canyon University

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Unsplash/Michael Sturgeon
Unsplash/Michael Sturgeon

With so many good and fun schools located in the state of Arizona, don’t waste time by applying to Grand Canyon University. Located in Phoenix, the heat might get to students before the realization that they’ll have around $28,540 in debt after graduation, but that’s not even the worst part about this school.

According to one student, they were asked to pay $2,500 to retake a single class! Talk about a rip-off.

New Hampshire: Southern New Hampshire University

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Unsplash/Emmanuel Ikwuegbu
Unsplash/Emmanuel Ikwuegbu

Southern New Hampshire University has one steep annual tuition, coming in at a hot average net price of $34,984 per year. And the fact that graduates can expect their student loans to come out to around $30,044, almost a year’s worth of tuition, makes this school not too great.

According to a former student, the cost makes sense, as the university is definitely in it for the money and not much else.

Oklahoma: Northeastern State University

Oklahoma: Northeastern State University
Pinterest
Pinterest

Northeastern State University in Oklahoma is one of those odd schools that has a 100% acceptance rate. But, those schools typically have a story to tell. And Northeastern State University’s story is that it has a low 26% graduation rate, and those students can expect to have a $20,324 student loan debt.

A big complaint about this school isn’t just the graduation rate but the fact that students have a hard time finding local positions and the lack of support NSU gives in that regard.

Kansas: Wichita State University

Wichita State University
William Purnell/Icon Sportswire/Corbis/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
William Purnell/Icon Sportswire/Corbis/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

With a 92% acceptance rate, the fact that only 55% of students graduate from Wichita State University should be a slight deterrent for prospective freshmen. The debt graduates have to look forward to also doesn’t help, around $32,636 with an 8.5% interest rate.

Many students can maybe overlook the high loan, but only if the school readily prepared them for the real world and workforce, which, according to former students, WSU does not.

Oregon: Western Oregon University

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Unsplash/Alex Jones
Unsplash/Alex Jones

Western Oregon University in Oregon isn’t horrible, but it’s up to students to make connections and network to get a good job after graduation. The somewhat good news is that after paying an average net price of $15,496 per year, students can expect a student loan debt of $23,696, a price few find difficult to pay off.

The sum isn’t hard for many WOU graduates to pay off because, after six years, most medium incomes are at least $39,700.

Pennsylvania: Edinboro University

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Unsplash/Davide Cantelli
Unsplash/Davide Cantelli

Honestly, for anyone looking into the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, please hop on over to Penn State and call it a day. There is no need to attend Edinboro University for an average net price of $15,223.

Students who pull loans to attend this school are looking at a horrible debt of $31,324 upon graduation. And that’s knowing that a majority of people will only make $35,400 after six years in the workforce.

Alabama: Auburn University At Montgomery

No, not that Auburn University but Auburn University at Montgomery in Alabama. Truth be told, this university is very easy to get into, but even with a 93% acceptance rate, less than 35% graduate. That’s not a stellar statistic for students looking for a good education.

Not only that, but according to previous students, Auburn University at Montgomery has a nonexistent student life, making pricy year fees and accompanying debt not exactly worth it.

Kentucky: Morehead State University

Morehead State
Jamie Sabau/Getty Images
Jamie Sabau/Getty Images

There is a price when it comes to a good education, and, according to a former Morehead State University student, it’s not an annual net price of $12,528 with a debt of $24,384 after four years.

Apparently, the low tuition is a prime example of “students getting what they pay for,” as this former MSU attendee reports that their time at the school was miserable. In a review, they wrote, “I have to start all over at a new school just to redo the damage they did in helping me with my future.”

Louisiana: McNeese State University

The only thing that has the potential to pull people to McNeese State University in Louisiana is its cost compared to the state’s larger institutions, such as Louisiana State University.

Students at MSU will play a net price of $9,985 per year! But at what cost? According to many former students, that cost is brought down by the lack of value in an actual education, the reason people are venturing towards higher education in the first place!

Hawaii: University of Hawaii – Maui College

University of Hawaii - Maui College
Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

For many people, Hawaii might be a dream state to attend college, with the beautiful beaches and balmy weather. If that’s the case, steer clear of the University of Hawaii, Maui College.

According to one student, Maui College is a “pay-for-what-you-get school,” meaning there aren’t many helpful resources, and the campus could use some updating. Pretty much, don’t let the $10,373 annual net price of the school fool you because, at the end of four years, students are whacked with a 23% interest rate.

Illinois: Columbia College Chicago

Columbia College Chicago
Interim Archives/Getty Images
Interim Archives/Getty Images

The thing about Columbia College Chicago in Illinois is that while it might be in a great location, the fees and debt aren’t stellar compared to the median income graduates can expect to earn six years into the workforce.

After four years of attending CCC, students can expect to walk away with a diploma and a debt of $31,824, a horrible sum compared to the median salary of $34,400 after six years of work.

Massachusetts: Berklee College of Music

Berklee College of Music
David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Unfortunately, a niche music school isn’t the best for higher education, and Massachusetts’ Berklee College of Music is no different. On top of the small 47% acceptance rate, the annual tuition price is enough to give anyone a heart attack. The average annual net price is $43,799.

The truth of the matter is that students who attend Berklee will be in for a world of debt, at least $51,280, and are most likely going to wait around for years until they “make it” in the industry.

New Jersey: New Jersey City University

While New Jersey City University’s average net price for tuition is only $12,476, students can expect to graduate with a hefty student loan debt on their shoulders. Most students will leave NJCU with a solid $31,256 debt to take care of.

According to a former student, the debt isn’t worth the hassle, as admissions and financial aid are known to make everything pretty hard for their students. And, while going to school, those are the last things people should worry about.

New Mexico: Brookline College – Albuquerque

Brookline College - Albuquerque
Pinterest
Pinterest

Some graduates of Brookline College – Albuquerque say attending the school was a waste of time and money. Considering the academics are average, and the average net price is $25,206 per year, that isn’t surprising.

Tack on the fact that four-year students who make it to graduation have a hefty $51,636 student loan debt they now have to take care of, and this particular institution is looking more and more like a college to bypass.