College Degrees That Won’t Take You Far In Life

For some, attending college may be the best four years of your life but what you choose to major in during your time can have a huge impact on your career opportunities once you graduate. Picking the right major when you enter college can be hard and while you don’t need to make a decision right away, you need to evaluate all of your options.

Some people may tell you that you should study what you love, regardless of the job opportunities but this can only end up being an expensive waste of your time. Here are the most useless college degrees that can make employment a challenge.

Culinary Arts

For those who aspire to be a chef, culinary school was once seen as a necessity to achieve this goal. However, tuition fees in culinary schools are on the rise and unfortunately, the salary of budding chefs doesn’t match up to the cost. In recent years, the return from culinary school isn’t as high as it once was and it is no longer a requirement to become a chef in many restaurants.

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Pinterest

In fact, culinary graduates only make 2-11 percent more income than their peers who didn’t attend culinary school. While some chefs still value this professional training, most restaurateurs don’t have a preference, so long as those applying have the inherent skill and a knack for cooking. Hence, it would worthwhile to spend more time in the kitchen, mastering your cooking skills.

Fashion Design

The world of fashion is vast and constantly changing so many see fashion school as a great opportunity to gain some contacts and get your foot in the industry. While this may seem like a worthwhile reason to get a degree in fashion design, you need to think about the competition that comes along with it.

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Xurxo Lobato/Cover/Getty Images
Xurxo Lobato/Cover/Getty Images

Fashion as a career requires an artistic ability that needs to be inherent. There is no school that can teach you these skills but can only help you build on your current skill set. In an industry with such fierce competition, finding employment can be quite the challenge. Nearly 3.6 percent of fashion designers are unemployed.

Art History

Art history can be a very interesting subject to study but is not a great choice for a long-term career. The reason for this is that the subject itself is quite niche and the skills you learn from a degree like this one can’t be transferred to many jobs. You would need numerous years of study and research in the field to attain an academic or curatorial job.

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Leemage/Corbis via Getty Images
Leemage/Corbis via Getty Images

A degree in art history doesn’t come cheap as they cost an upward of $50,000 with no solid return on investment. Many people who major in art history may need to take up additional jobs to pay off the debt. The current unemployment rate for this major is 6.6 percent.

Music

A vast majority of the most well-known musicians in the world will attribute their success to hard work, luck and lots of practice. You will also find that these musicians didn’t get a degree in music to develop their talent. However, in the case of certain instruments like the piano or the violin, a fair amount of tuition is required.

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Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

It would be wise not to take up music as a major unless you have been offered a place in a prestigious school like Julliard or Berklee. If not, the chances of making it in the big leagues are quite slim. It might be better to spend the music degree money on some high-quality instruments.

Psychology

Given the awareness of mental health, it’s no surprise that psychology can be a popular major among college students. A study of the human mind can be quite fascinating but when you are one among a million of other college students with the same degree, the chances of finding a job are quite low, and 6 percent of psychology degree holders are unemployed.

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Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

In order to get a good job in the field of psychology, you would need to get a doctorate as a bachelor’s degree in the subject is no longer sufficient. If you do decide to major in psychology, you could always find a niche area that translates to other fields like marketing.

Communications

Communications is a degree that covers many areas of the arts like media or broadcasting and it’s the vagueness of the subject that makes it hard to find employment. This is also tied to the fact that many forms of media like journalism are being taken over by social media.

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Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images
Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Which is why many people who pick communications are usually unsure of what they want to study in college. While it can be exciting to learn about various fields under a single umbrella, it can be hard to master a few specific skills that you can apply professionally. The current unemployment rate among communication degree holders is 6.3 percent.

Liberal arts

Liberal arts is often seen as a no-brainer degree and this is far from the truth. This major exercises the creative part of your brain and improves your critical thinking and analytical skills which are important for your career.

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Justin Sullivan via Getty Images
Justin Sullivan via Getty Images

However, in a world that is driven by science and technology, the demand for liberal arts graduates only gets lower every year. In fact, less than 2 percent of employers are actively seeking graduates with this major. Liberal arts can be an interesting degree to major in but it doesn’t offer too many employment opportunities. The current unemployment rate for liberal arts graduates is 6.7 percent.

Studio/ fine arts

Studio arts is a very unique major but by no means is it a way to make money as soon as you graduate. The world of artists is so saturated that it takes multiple years to actually beat out the competition and get recognition for your work. After all, your work depends on your skill and whether or not it matches other peoples’ personal taste.

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Tony Evans via Getty Images
Tony Evans via Getty Images

Instead of pursuing a degree in fine arts, it would be better to freelance in studio arts and wait to see if you generate enough income before you go full-time. Having a side hustle can also help you build up a portfolio that you can showcase to clients. The current unemployment rate for fine art majors is 9.1 percent.

Performing arts

If you are a budding actor, a major in performing arts may seem like the right move but think again. A majority of the actors we see on television didn’t make it big through professional training but through a lot of hard work and raw talent. Although some actors did go to performing arts schools to cultivate their existing skills.

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Photo credit should read TORSTEN BLACKWOOD/AFP via Getty Images
Photo credit should read TORSTEN BLACKWOOD/AFP via Getty Images

Instead of majoring in performing arts, if you truly believe you are cut-out for acting, it would be wiser to get an acting coach who could help you develop your skill. Additionally, you would also need to attend numerous auditions and make a few contacts in the industry to get your big break.

Anthropology and Archeology

Both Anthropology and Archeology are incredibly interesting subjects that can help you develop your cognitive skills for your professional life. While this may make the subject attractive, the problem lies in the fact that this area of study is very niche.

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CESAR MANSO/AFP via Getty Images
CESAR MANSO/AFP via Getty Images

For many graduates with this major, there is no definitive career path to take. You may even need to get a doctorate in the field to improve your chances for employment. You should only major in Anthropology and Archeology if you are truly passionate about the subject, otherwise, it could end up being a waste of time and money.

Composition and Rhetoric

Research shows that print media has only 10 or so years left but this doesn’t mean that there is no scope for writers. While print may be dead, it doesn’t reduce the need for information but only changes the way we consume it. Having a writing skill is important but a degree in composition and rhetoric is not.

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Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The major is quite vague and covers a broad aspect of writing rather than focusing on a single field. If you have a passion for writing, it would be more useful to major in English literature. The unemployment rate for composition and rhetoric is 20 percent.

Environmental science

With the impending effects of climate change, there is a need for environmental scientists however, this does not equal a need for an environmental science major. While in theory the major is related to the environment, it covers a broad spectrum of the subject instead of focusing on a single resource.

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Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

In order to improve your opportunities in the field of environmental science, you could major in physics, chemistry or biology and then use your skills in the field of environmental science. The current unemployment rate for this major is 11.79 percent.

Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship as a major is like watching a tutorial on how to do something without actually doing it. While you may get some advice, there’s no real learning there until you take the leap and start your own business.

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MediaNews Group/Bay Area News via Getty Images
MediaNews Group/Bay Area News via Getty Images

Many entrepreneurs will tell you that it is not something that can be taught and many of the lessons learned are from the risks you take and mistakes you make in the real world. As an alternative to majoring in entrepreneurship, you can start your business as a side hustle until you are confident enough to go full time.

Languages

Learning how to speak a language can do wonders for your resume especially as globalization increases but this is still no reason to major in a certain language. Language as a major will teach you about the history of the language as well which you may never actually put into practice. All the knowledge you need to learn about a language comes from the real world.

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Michael G. Seamans/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images
Michael G. Seamans/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Instead of majoring in a language, you can use an online tool like Duolingo or even take an evening class to pick up a new language. This is also a lot more cost-effective than a college degree.

Sociology

Sociology, as the name suggests, is a study of how society works and while this may sound interesting, it is not a worthwhile college major. Those who have a degree in sociology lean towards jobs in non-profits or as a social worker. Unfortunately, the employment rates for these jobs is not too high.

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Mondadori via Getty Images
Mondadori via Getty Images

Although research shows that the employment levels for social workers will pick up in the future, the salary for these jobs is not too competitive. The average salary for a social worker in the United States is only $57,000 per year.

Microelectronic Engineering

Microelectronics deals with the study of home electronic devices and instruments are made. Unfortunately, with the advent of AI and robots, many of these jobs will be replaced in a few years. Research shows that the demand for people in semiconductor processors will drop by 27 percent in the next few years.

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Additionally, the median wage for a person with a microelectronics engineering degree is only $33,950. If you wish to study electronics, you would be better of majoring in technology. Microelectronic engineering is too specific which can make it a challenge to find employment.

Hospitality and tourism

Tourism is big, especially in major metropolitan cities and while the job prospects for people with this major look good, the pay you can expect to receive is not that great. For those who work at the front desk at hotels, the employment rate is expected to increase by 13 percent in the next few years, but unfortunately, the median pay for this job is only $20,400 per year.

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JHU Sheridan Libraries/Gado/Getty Images
JHU Sheridan Libraries/Gado/Getty Images

For the managers of hotels, the salary is only $46,000 per year and the employment rate for travel agents is also expected to drop by 12.1 percent in the next few years. While it may be an interesting major, the job prospects for a tourism degree are quite slim.

Criminal justice

If you wish to become a police officer or a detective, a degree in criminal justice might make sense but in reality, it serves no purpose. Many officer and detective training programs don’t require anything more than your high school diploma. This is because most of the learning for the job is done during the training period.

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Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images
Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images

Additionally, the other job prospects for a degree in criminal justice are quite low. Research shows that the employment rate for officers is only expected to increase by 5.9 percent from 2012-22. Hence, a degree in criminal justice doesn’t hold too much value.

Philosophy

Philosophy is an important subject and many people use it to make better decisions. However, when it comes to college majors, a degree in Philosophy is not worth your time. This is mostly because of the framework of the subject. Many of the topics that are discussed in Philosophy classes don’t apply to the real world and hence have no practical use.

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Photo by David Degner via Getty Images
Photo by David Degner via Getty Images

If you want to improve your philosophy skills, you could always read books on the subject. This can help you apply the principles to the real world and is more cost-effective than a college degree.

Creative writing

If you are looking to expand your creative skills, a degree in creative writing is not the answer. This is because many creative writing classes focus on literature that was written many years ago and not on modern fiction, making it hard to apply your degree to your job after you graduate.

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Photo by Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images
Photo by Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Additionally, people who make it in the creative writing field are usually authors of famous books. If you want to expand your creative writing skills, you can start your own blog where you can write your thoughts and ideas on your favorite topic. Once you have a large following, you can even monetize your platform.

Arkansas: The University Of Arkansas At Little Rock

With a low graduation rate of 42%, the University of Arkansas at Little Rock probably isn’t worth an incoming freshman’s money. The average price to attend Little Rock is a solid $13,256, making the perspective debt after four years a staggering $27,112.

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Jamie Schwaberow/NCAA Photos via Getty Images
Jamie Schwaberow/NCAA Photos via Getty Images

Considering the median income after six years of work is only $34,900, Little Rock graduates can assume they’ll be paying their student loans off for the foreseeable future.

Maryland: Frostburg State University

Students can expect to earn a solid salary after six years in the workforce with a degree from Frostburg State University in Maryland. First, they have to get through those four years. Only 47% of students end up graduating from this school and, considering how outdated it is, it’s not surprising.

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Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

From the classrooms to the dormitories, there isn’t much to look at, as the university hasn’t updated its campus in years. Add on the fact that there isn’t much to do in the surrounding town, and Frostburg drops off the “cool school” list.

Vermont: Goddard College

Goddard College in Vermont might have a quaint and lovely campus, but prospective students have to keep in mind that there is a tiny student population of just 364. This means there is little to no campus and social life.

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Unsplash/Eliabe Costa
Unsplash/Eliabe Costa

On top of that, the average net price to attend isn’t for the faint of heart. Students can expect to pay around $23,187 per year, and those who take out student loans can look forward to a hefty $31,452 debt upon graduation.

Deleware: Delaware Technical Community College – Terry

A 100% acceptance rate might sound nice for those students who aren’t sure where they’ll be accepted out of high school. But when the graduation rate is a staggeringly low 14%, they might want to weigh their options and not attend Delaware Technical Community College, Terry.

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Would If/Pinterest
Would If/Pinterest

Not only is the graduation rate pretty much nonexistent, but the post-graduate support looks to be in the same boat. One student wrote a review saying everything is on the student, with the faculty not really helping out.

Connecticut: Southern Connecticut State University

Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, Connecticut, might be beautiful, but that natural beauty comes at a steep price. The annual net price to attend this university is a solid $17,389, giving students $26,936 worth of debt to look forward to after graduation.

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Unsplash/Wes Hicks
Unsplash/Wes Hicks

Not only that, but many students have written reviews stating the professors aren’t the best around. One student wrote, “most of them [professors] felt like they didn’t care if you were even there or not.”

Rhode Island: Johnson & Wales University – Providence

The state of Rhode Island is known to be a bit on the pricier side, and Johnson & Wales University in Providence is no different, asking for a whopping average net price of $28,089 per year. For students who make it through all four years, most likely taking out student loans during that time, they’re looking at a cringe-worthy debt of $36,804.

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Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

With those numbers in mind, it might be best for prospective student’s financial futures to look at higher education elsewhere.

Michigan: Henry Ford College

Henry Ford College in Michigan has a staggeringly low annual net tuition price of $3,299, making it an attractive choice for locals. But, as one senior wrote, people are better off not attending college than attending Henry Ford.

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Unsplash/Sincerely Media
Unsplash/Sincerely Media

While the acceptance rate is 100%, only 6% make it to graduation with a loan interest rate of 21.8% to look forward to. That senior might be on to something when they wrote not to attend this college.

California: Unitek College, Fremont

Considering California takes up a majority of the western coast of the United States, there are many colleges to choose from. So, don’t settle for Unitek College – Fremont, a school that has a 100% acceptance rate and a student population of fewer than 4,000.

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Unsplash/Thought Catalog
Unsplash/Thought Catalog

Ironically, the school advertises as a place of higher education that accepts everyone at a fair price. Too bad the price is well above the national average, at an average annual net price of $50,281.

Nevada: Sierra Nevada University

Don’t let Sierra Nevada University’s scenic Lake Tahoe location fool prospective students; it’s not the best place to get a higher education. Not only is the average net price to attend around $30,352 per year, but students can expect a student loan debt of around $21,524 after graduation.

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Unsplash/David Kennedy
Unsplash/David Kennedy

According to one freshman, for the price, the school isn’t worth it. In a review, they said, “I didn’t have any growth in my major and no room for growth otherwise.”

Florida: Florida Technical College, Orlando

Florida Technical College is one of those schools that’s average with nothing overly exciting about it. Well, unless people credit excessive student loans and a horrible income six years into the workforce, “exciting.”

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Unsplash/LinkedIn Sales Solutions
Unsplash/LinkedIn Sales Solutions

Graduating from Florida Technical College in Orlando, Florida, students can expect to make an average salary of $24,600 after paying an average of $15,442 per year. That salary is well below the national average and not nearly enough to live off of while trying to pay off student loans.

Georgia: Georgia Gwinnett College

Georgia Gwinnett College in Georgia has a low tuition cost: an annual net price of $11,735, making it an attractive school for students who don’t feel like spending years after graduation paying off loans. But they shouldn’t let the low numbers fool them.

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Unsplash/Siora Photography
Unsplash/Siora Photography

With a 100% acceptance rate, only 17% of students wind up walking in a cap and gown for graduation. Clearly, dropping out is a common occurrence. Then again, students are getting what they paid for, which, at the end of the day, obviously isn’t great.

Colorado: Pikes Peak Community College

While community colleges are a great way to save money, Pikes Peak Community College in Colorado isn’t worth it. Yes, it is cheaper to attend than, say, Boulder or Denver, but, according to students, the faculty and overall atmosphere of the college are horrible.

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In a review, one freshman wrote, “The attitude I got from the higher-ups … is that they couldn’t care less about me, my grades, my life, my hopes for a degree, nothing.”

North Carolina: The University Of North Carolina At Pembroke

When it comes to the UNC system in North Carolina, the University of North Carolina at Pembroke doesn’t deliver. Yes, its average tuition price of $11,576 per year is low compared to other universities in the system, but that doesn’t mean the services are good.

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Unsplash/Steniar Engeland
Unsplash/Steniar Engeland

In fact, one student has gone on record saying the faculty at the University of North Carolina Pembroke isn’t great and that it’s not worth the $22,368 student loan debt.

New York: SUNY Medgar Evers College

City lovers will be happy to know that there are many colleges in New York, meaning they don’t have to settle for CUNY Medgar Evers College. While the average net price for tuition is a very low $6,677 per year, it doesn’t make up for the low percentage of people that actually graduate.

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SUNY
SUNY

According to a former student, CUNY Medgar Evers College has unobtainable standards for its students, making their graduation rate 16% from its 90% acceptance.

Maine: The University Of Maine At Augusta

For incoming freshmen interested in diving into the University of Maine school system, there is no harm in skipping the Augusta campus. While the annual net price to attend school looks attractive at under $10,000, that’s pretty much all that’s good about this particular university.

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The University Of Maine At Augusta
The University Of Maine At Augusta

Students can expect to leave school after four years with considerable debt. And if that wasn’t enough, interest rates for those loans tend to be around 16.8%, a substantial jump from the national average.

South Carolina: Coastal Carolina University

According to a former senior, after four years, no one particularly likes attending Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina aside from its fantastic Myrtle Beach location. That’s not exactly a selling feature, considering most people want to attend for education.

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Unsplash/Element5 Digital
Unsplash/Element5 Digital

It also doesn’t help that the average net price to attend CCU is $16,368 per year, leaving students who take out loans looking at a debt of $37,692 after graduation. Ouch.

Arizona: Grand Canyon University

With so many good and fun schools located in the state of Arizona, don’t waste time by applying to Grand Canyon University. Located in Phoenix, the heat might get to students before the realization that they’ll have around $28,540 in debt after graduation, but that’s not even the worst part about this school.

GCU
Grand Canyon University
Grand Canyon University

According to one student, they were asked to pay $2,500 to retake a single class! Talk about a rip-off.

New Hampshire: Southern New Hampshire University

Southern New Hampshire University has one steep annual tuition, coming in at a hot average net price of $34,984 per year. And the fact that graduates can expect their student loans to come out to around $30,044, almost a year’s worth of tuition, makes this school not too great.

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Southern New Hampshire University
Southern New Hampshire University

According to a former student, the cost makes sense, as the university is definitely in it for the money and not much else.

Oklahoma: Northeastern State University

Northeastern State University in Oklahoma is one of those odd schools that has a 100% acceptance rate. But, those schools typically have a story to tell. And Northeastern State University’s story is that it has a low 26% graduation rate, and those students can expect to have a $20,324 student loan debt.

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Pinterest
Pinterest

A big complaint about this school isn’t just the graduation rate but the fact that students have a hard time finding local positions and the lack of support NSU gives in that regard.

Kansas: Wichita State University

With a 92% acceptance rate, the fact that only 55% of students graduate from Wichita State University should be a slight deterrent for prospective freshmen. The debt graduates have to look forward to also doesn’t help, around $32,636 with an 8.5% interest rate.

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Facebook/Wichita State University
Facebook/Wichita State University

Many students can maybe overlook the high loan, but only if the school readily prepared them for the real world and workforce, which, according to former students, WSU does not.