The Most Successful Products To Ever Appear On Shark Tank

First premiering on ABC in 2009, Shark Tank is a business reality show that features aspiring entrepreneurs that pitch their products to investors known as “Sharks” who decide whether they want to invest or not. Over the years, countless people have nervously stood in front of the Sharks hoping to strike a deal, with many walking home empty-handed. Yet, that isn’t always the case. These are the products that went on to strike it big, with or without the help of the Sharks.

ReadeREST – $27 Million

readerest product
Rick Hopper/YouTube
Rick Hopper/YouTube

Rick Hopper, the founder of ReadeREST, came up with his idea while working as a supervisor at Home Depot, finding that he was always misplacing his reading glasses. This led him to design a glasses holder that attaches to any shirt the user’s wearing with a magnet that is snug enough so the glasses don’t fall out when bending over.

After signing a deal with Lori Greiner for $150,000 for 65% of the company, ReadeREST sold $100,000 worth of product after its first appearance on QVC and has done more than $27 million in sales since.

Cousins Maine Lobster – $20 Million

Picture of contestants
ABC
ABC

Hailing from Maine, the country’s premier location for lobster dishes, cousins Jim Tselikis and Sabin Lomac brought the Maine lobster eating experience to Los Angeles by opening up a food truck.

Incredibly, Shark Tank actually reached out to the cousins to appear on the show. After delivering their pitch, Barbara Corcoran invested $55,000 into their venture, which helped them add more trucks to their quickly growing business. Today, Cousins Maine Lobster has sales of over $2 million.

Bubba Q’s – $16 Million

Picture of Contestant
ABC
ABC

In 2014, the former NFL player All “Bubba” Baker stepped into the tank where he pitched his business for his boneless ribs and sauce company called Bubba Q’s. Daymond John was intrigued by the idea and made a deal to invest $300,000 in return for 30% of Baker’s company.

Before the show, Bubba Q’s had a low $154,000 in sales, only to reach $16 million by 2017. To top it all off, Baker also owns the patent for making his product, making him the only person able to sell deboned and cooked ribs.

Ring – $1.1 Billion

Picture from show
ABC
ABC

Although the doorbell-camera Ring recently sold to Amazon for $1.1 billion, things did not look up for CEO James Siminoff when he appeared on the show in 2013. The Sharks were less-than-impressed with his idea, with only O’Leary even taking the time to make a deal. However, the joke was on them, as Ring went on to be uber-successful.

After selling to Amazon for over $1 billion, Siminoff used some of this money to pay Shaquille O’Neal, who agreed to be a spokesman for the company in 2016, in exchange for equity, making him rich in the end. Here, we can see the prototype demonstrated on the show and what the product has evolved into today.

Copa Di Vino – $14 Million

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ABC
ABC

Copa Di Vino’s founder, James Martin, has been on Shark Tank not once but twice! His first appearance was in 2011 with his concept for a single-serving wine portion to preserve the beverage’s freshness.

While he walked away without a deal, he still went on to make $5 million! This led the Sharks to invite him onto the show yet again in 2017, although nobody still wanted to go into business with him. That didn’t stop him from selling more than 38 million of his product that year, with the company now being worth $14 million.

Simply Fit Board – $160 Million

Picture of contestants
ABC
ABC

Although they might look a little awkward, the Simply Fit Board is a balance workout device designed to engage the user’s core. Founders Gloria Hoffman and Linda Clark revealed their product on the show in 2015, which caught Lori Greiner’s eye, who saw major potential.

Quickly, she helped the two women establish a patent, and with her sway with QVC, the company’s sales went from just $757,000 to $9 million in months. Today, more than $160 million of Simply Fit boards have been sold.

Drop Stop – $24 Million

Picture of contestants
ABC
ABC

An annoyance most people have experienced in a car at least once is losing something in the cracks of the seats. Well, this inconvenience gave co-founders Marc Newburger and Jeffery Simon the idea to invent the Drop Stop, which prevents objects from falling into what they call the “Carmuda Triangle.”

In 2012, the two entrepreneurs appeared on the show, demonstrating how their foam invention stopped lose articles from getting lost in the car and secured a sweet deal that helped their company grow to have more than $24 million in sales.

FiberFix – $50 million

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ABC
ABC

FiberFix is a company that prides itself on being a product that can fix what duct tape or other similar products can’t. What makes FiberFix different from other adhesive brands is that it is a top-of-the-line adhesive tape that, when applied, hardens to create a watertight and permanent seal on just about any surface.

Co-founders Spencer Quinn and Eric Child appeared on the show in 2013, impressing Lori Greiner into making a deal, and has since made over $50 million in sales.

Mission Belt – $40 Million

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ABC
ABC

The Mission Belt was invented by Zach Holzapfel and Jeff Jensen, who wanted to make a belt that did away with the classic notch system to create an essentially one-size-fits-all belt.

Of course, the design and the fact that the belt comes in a variety of colors and designs caught the attention of fashion industry titan Daymond John when the Mission Belt made its way onto the show in 2012. The belt has since reached $25 million in sales, with Zach and Jeff donating $1 of every belt to help small businesses in developing countries.

Scrub Daddy – $200 Million

Picture from the show
ABC
ABC

One of the most well-known products to come out of Shark Tank is the Scrub Daddy, a hard smiley-faced sponge that can get off the worst stuck-on food, and when run under hot water, becomes soft like a regular sponge.

Inventor Aaron Krause managed to get Lori Greiner to invest $200,000 into his product, and it was a decision she did not regret. In 2017, Scrub Daddy reached $100 million in sales, the highest of any Shark Tank product, and has done more than $200 million since its inception.

Safe Grabs – $5 Million

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ABC
ABC

For anyone that spends time in the kitchen or is a fan of frozen meals, it’s likely that you’ve burned yourself removing a dish from the microwave. After having hurt her palms one too many times, Cyndi Lee came up with Safe Grabs, which are a silicone mat that is placed underneath your dish in the microwave.

Once the time is up, the mat acts like an oven mitt, protecting your hands from the heat of the dish. Lori Greiner saw an opportunity here and Safe Grabs has done more than $5 million in sales since Greiner invested $75,000 in 2016.

InstaFire – $5 Million

Picture from show
ABC
ABC

If you’ve ever tried, you know that starting a fire is no easy task, even if you’re indoors with the proper equipment. Yet, instaFire makes this issue a thing of the past with their kits, including volcanic rock, wood pellets, and paraffin wax that can create a flame up to 16 inches in height and stay burning for more than 30 minutes.

Small and compact, these kits were appealing to Mark Cuban and Lori Greiner, who invested $300,000 in total. Since appearing on the show, InstaFire has done more than $5 million in sales.

BedJet – $26 Million

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ABC
ABC

Mark Aramli, the founder of the BedJet is a former NASA employee that set out to solve the issue of being uncomfortably hot throughout the night. So, in 2015, he came on Shark Tank to demonstrate his invention, the BedJet, which is a climate-controlled mattress pad that allows the user to adjust the temperature of their bed.

However, the Sharks were thrown off by his $2.5 million valuation, leading nobody to invest. Just 18 months after the show, Armali had done more than $3 million in sales without their help and $26 million in revenue.

Tipsy Elves – $70 Million

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ABC
ABC

In recent years, ugly sweater parties have become more and more common during the holiday season, with people having to go to thrift stores or inside their grandmother’s closet to find one. This led Nick Morton and Evan Mendelsohn to create Tipsy Elves, a clothing company dedicated to ugly holiday sweaters.

Robert Herjavec agreed to invest $100,000 for 10% of the company back in 2013, resulting in sales of more than $10 million by 2015! Today, they have reached more than $70 million.

Kodiak Cakes – $100 Million

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ABC
ABC

Something that occurred to Joel Clark, the owner of Kodiak Cakes, was that people would forever love pancakes but don’t enjoy them as much as they would like because of the mix’s unhealthy contents.

So, Joel Clark created a flower-based mix containing whole grains and proteins that other companies don’t. In 2013, Clark walked away without a deal, as he didn’t want to give up 10% of his company. Today, Kodiak Cakes are now the fourth largest pancake mix on the market, doing more than $100 million in annual sales.

Squatty Potty – $30 Million

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ABC
ABC

In 2014, Bobby Evans entered the tank with a piece of plastic called the Squatty Potty that he designed that made going to the bathroom both easier and more natural. Lori Greiner was all over it and quickly invested $500,000, leading the company to do more than $1 million in sales just 24 hours after the taping was aired.

Since then, not only has the company surpassed more than $30 million in sales, but multiple researchers have indeed proven that Evans’ invention does in fact help with constipation.

GrooveBook – $14 Million

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ABC
ABC

Julie and Brian Wilson came up with GrooveBook when they noticed a demand for people to have their social media photos printed into physical copies. Nevertheless, they decided to take things one step further and organize them into a customized photo album.

The Wilsons came onto Shark Tank with just around 18,000 subscribers. However, after striking a deal with Mark Cuban and Kevin O’Leary, they had more than 500,000, eventually selling their company for $14.5 million to Shutterfly in 2015.

Chef Big Taste – $5 Million

Picture of contestant
ABC
ABC

Shawn Davis came onto the show in 2012, sure that he was going to get a deal with one of the sharks for his idea for a shrimp burger restaurant after making one for his episcopalian daughter.

Unfortunately, none of the Sharks were particularly excited about his idea, with Davis leaving his pitch hanging his head. Luckily for him, just being on the show was enough to get his business up and running with his restaurant, Chef Big Shake increasing from just $30,000 to $5 million in revenue.

Bottle Breacher – $15 Million

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ABC
ABC

Designed with the support of the military in mind, the Bottle Breacher is a sleek bottle opener hand-made out of .50 caliber bullets. The company is owned and operated by Eli Crane and his wife, Jen.

Crane is a former Navy Seal that wanted to give back to the military, with a percentage of the company’s revenue going toward non-profit military organizations. In 2014, Mark Cuban and Kevin O’Leary hopped on board and their sales went from just $150,000 to $15 million.

Moki Door Step – $3 Million

moki
Amazon
Amazon

Zach and Alyssa appeared on Shark Tank to present their invention, the Moki Door Step. This handy tool clips onto the car door frame to provide a step up for drivers who have roof racks on their car, or for handicapped drivers and passengers who have trouble getting in and out of a car.

They ended up partnering with Rightline Gear and have proven to be successful! One review even called the Moki, “the best car accessory ever”. The couple is happy to announce that they are seeing $65,000 a month in revenue for their invention.

Rocketbook – $10 Million

Picture of contestant
ABC
ABC

In 2017, Joe Lemay and Jake Epstein came onto Shark Tank in space suits looking for a $400,000 investment for 10% of their company RocketBook. Their product was a reusable smart notebook that could be microwaved to erase the previous writing.

Yet, the Sharks were unimpressed by the product, with Kevin O’Leary informing them that few people would be interested in a reusable paper notebook. Without the Sharks’ help, Rocketbook went on to sell over 500,000 products, hitting more than $10 million in sales.

Bala Bangles – $20 Million

Bala Bangles is presented on Shark Tank.
ABC
Amazon

Bala Bangles were invented by Natalie Holloway and Max Kislevitz in 2018. They wanted a simple tool that could aid with home workouts, whether worn on wrists or ankles or bent during stretches.

In 2019, Bala Bangles received a $900,000 investment from Mark Cuban. In 2020 alone, they made $20 million in revenue. They have also made sales agreements with major chains such as Nordstrom and Bloomingdales that might increase their sales in the following years.

The Comfy – $150 Million

Brian and Michael Speciale show off The Comfy on Shark Tank.
ABC
ABC

In 2017, Brian and Michael Speciale pitched an idea to Shark Tank. Michael saw his their seven-year-old son looked cozy in a giant, adult-sized hoodie. He asked his brother Brian, “Do you think they make those for adults?”

Barbara Corcoran invested $50,000 for a 30% stake in the company. Since then, The Comfy has earned over $150 million in revenue. Although many other businesses have created knock-offs of The Comfy, it remains at the top of the market.

Bombas Socks – $225 Million

David Heath and Randy Goldberg present Bombas Socks on Shark Tank.
ABC
ABC

In 2013, David Heath and Randy Goldberg created a pair of extra comfy socks. For every pair of socks sold, they would donate one pair to the homeless. Daymond John offered $200,000 for a 17% stake in the company.

Since then, Bombas Socks have become one of Shark Tank’s bestselling items. It has earned $225 million and donated over 25 million pairs of socks to the homeless. Even now, Bombas Socks continue to earn stellar reviews for being blister-proof and breathable.

The Bouqs – $100 Million

John Tabis talks about The Bouqs on Shark Tank.
ABC
ABC

Founded by John Tabis and Juan Pablo Montúfar, The Bouqs Co. is an online delivery service for fresh-cut flowers. By eliminating stores and warehouses, the company can save up to 80% of their profits and sell bouquets for less than traditional florists.

Despite this, when Tabis revealed his company on Shark Tank, none of the sharks bit. That was their loss. The company has received over $100 million in sales, and it might earn $1 million on Valentine’s Day alone.

The Sleep Styler – $100 Million

Tara Brown demonstrates the Sleep Styler on her own hair for Shark Tank.
ABC
ABC

Ophthalmologist Tara Brown never had time to curl her hair. So she created hair curlers out of yoga mat material that will style your hair overnight. In 2016, she presented her invention, The Sleep Styler, to Shark Tank.

Lori Greiner offered $75,000 for a 30% stake. Three weeks after the episode aired, the company already made deals with major retailers such as Walmart, Bed Bath & Beyond, and Amazon. Currently, The Sleep Styler has earned over $100 million in sales.

Kitu Super Coffee – $200 Million

Containers of Kitu super coffee stand on a table with coffee beans.
Amazon
Amazon

In 2015, all-conference basketball player Jordan DeCicco invented a new type of coffee in his college dorm. His invention, the ready-to-drink Super Coffee, contains zero grams of sugar, ten grams of lactose-free protein, and MCT oil for energy.

When Super Coffee appeared on season nine of Shark Tank, it received no deals. However, consumers love it. It now goes by the name Kitu Super Coffee and has made over $200 million in revenue. The business has received investments from NBA star Baron Davis, Patrick Schwarzenegger, and Jennifer Lopez.

Plated – $300 Million

Nick Taranto and Josh Hix present Plated to Shark Tank.
ABC
ABC

In 2012, Harvard grads Nick Taranto and Josh Hix launched Plated. This meal subscription service delivered pre-packaged fresh food and chef-designed recipes to peoples’ homes. Unlike other meal delivery services, these were usually sourced from local ingredients.

On Shark Tank, Mark Cuban invested $500,000 for 5.6% of the company. By 2015, Plated jumped to $100 million in revenue. Two years later, Albertsons acquired the business and skyrocketed it to $300 million. Plated continues to earn more and more each year.

Bantam Bagels – $20 Million

Packages of Bantam bagels are displayed on a table.
Big J Reviews/YouTube
Big J Reviews/YouTube

In 2013, Nick and Elyse Oleksak created Bantam Bagels, mini bagels that came stuffed with different flavored cream cheeses. Although it sounds like a simple idea, it transformed into a multi-million dollar franchise.

In 2014, Lori Greiner invested $275,000 for 25% in company shares. Bantam Bagels was later sold to T. Marzetti Company for $34 million, and a year later, it made a deal with Starbucks. The business now makes over $20 million every year.

Everlywell – $300 million

Julia Cheek presents Everlywell on Shark Tank.
ABC
ABC

Founded by Julia Cheek, Everlywell is an online health company that at-home provides testing kits. On the website, you can purchase at-home kits for almost anything from vitamin D deficiency to fertility, with food sensitivities being the most popular.

In 2017, Lori Greiner invested $1 million for 5% stakes in the company. Three years later, Everlywell earned $140 million in retail sales. When COVID-19 test kits went on sale, business skyrocketed, and Everlywell’s net worth exceeds $300 million today.

Sand Cloud – $200 Million

Bruno Aschidamini, Steven Ford, and Brandon Leibel present Sand Cloud to Shark Tank.
ABC
Top5.com

In 2014, Bruno Aschidamini, Steven Ford, and Brandon Leibel wanted a beach towel that would prevent people from burning their feet on the sand. They created a Turkish towel with a removable foot pillow called the Sand Cloud.

On Shark Tank, Robert Herjavec invested $200,000 for 8% equity. The company now makes over $200 million. For every towel sold (which range from $39 to $65), Sand Cloud donates 10% to marine life conservation. Herjavec scored!

Lollaland Lollacup – $10 Million

A Lollacup is attached to a stroller.
Amazon
Amazon

Hanna and Mark Lim noticed that their toddler struggled to drink through straws with standard, spill-proof cups. They designed her own spill-proof, BPA-free cups called Lollacups that allow babies to easily drink through the straw.

In 2018, the couple presented their company, Lollaland, on Shark Tank. Both Mark Cuban and Robert Herjavec invested $100,000 for 40% equity. Before the show, Lollaland made $30,000 selling their cups; today, the business makes over $10 million and sells in major chains such as Bed Bath & Beyond

Sun-Staches – $30 Million

Dan Gerson, David Levich, and Eric Liberman wear their sun-staches.
ABC
ABC

College buddies Dan Gerson, David Levich, and Eric Liberman had an idea for quirky sunglasses. Their Sun-Staches have fake mustaches attached and come in a variety of designs and colors. Even before Shark Tank, their business made $5.7 million in sales.

Daymond John paid $300,000 for 20% stakes. Sun-Staches now sell at Amazon, Urban Outfitters, Toys R Us and Party City, and they even signed a $4.2 million contract with Marvel. As of 2021, the company has made over $30 million.

PhoneSoap – $46 Million

A woman opens a Phonesoap with her iPhone inside.
Michelle Matherne/Pinterest
Michelle Matherne/Pinterest

In 2012, cousins Wes La Porte and Dan Barnes invented a new way to sanitize smartphones: PhoneSoap. The device projects UV-C rays onto phones, and within ten minutes, it kills 99.99% of germs.

Lori Greiner fought Mark Cuban for investment and won, paying $300,000 for 10% equity. Within a year, sales rose to $5 million and PhoneSoap appeared in 1,500 stores. By 2021, the company’s net worth rose to $46 million, and each device sells for around $80.

Breathometer – $50 Million

Charles Michael Yim demonstrates his Breathometer on Shark Tank.
ABC
ABC

In 2013, Charles Michael Yim invented an iOS and Android device that measures blood alcohol content. He called it the Breathometer and presented it to Shark Tank in 2013. Although he initially asked for $250,000 for a 10% stake, all five sharks paid him $1 million for 30% stakes.

The company’s net worth quickly rose to $50 million. However, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) later claimed that the Breathometer is not scientifically sound. Despite the hits, the company still makes at least $5.1 million.

Simple Sugars – $30 Million

Lani Lazzari presents Simple Sugars to the sharks of Shark Tank.
ABC
ABC

In 2005, Lani Lazzari designed an all-natural skincare company that caters to people with sensitive skin. Her company, called Simple Sugars, sells everything from soap bars to body lotions to foot scrubs.

A year after launching the business, Lazzari brought Simple Sugars to Shark Tank. Mark Cuban offered to $100,000 for a 33% stake, which she accepted. By 2018, Simple Sugars had earned over $10 million; in 2021, it has a net worth of $30 million.

Wicked Good Cupcakes – $15 Million

Tracey Noonan and Danielle Vilagie stand by a jars of cupcakes displayed on tables for Shark Tank.
ABC
ABC

Wicked Good Cupcakes is not an average cupcake shop. Founded by Tracey Noonan and Danielle Vilagie, the company packages cakes in adorable jars that also sell in packs of two, four, six, and 12.

When Wicked Good Cupcakes appeared on Shark Tank, Kevin O’Leary asked for $1 for every cupcake sold. In return, he gave the company $74,000 to start. Today, Wicked Good Cupcakes now has a net worth of over $15 million despite many other sellers copying its design.

Lumio – $6 Million

Max Gunawan holds up his invention, Lumio, on Shark Tank.
ABC
ABC

Invented by Max Gunawan, Lumio is a portable lamp that people can fold into different shapes, for desks, walls, and even keeping in your bag. After his kickstarter earned over $570,000, Gunawan took his invention to Shark Tank.

Several sharks battled for this product, but in the end, Robert Herjavec won with a $350,000 payment for 10% equity. It was a smart investment. By 2013, sales garnered over $3 million, and now the company has made over $6 million.

Ten Thirty One Productions – $5 Million

Melissa Carbone and Alyson Richards present Ten Thirty One Productions on Shark tank.
ABC
ABC

Ten Thirty One Productions is an entertainment company that produces and hosts live horror entertainment, mainly Halloween attractions. When founders Melissa Carbone and Alyson Richards launched it in 2009, it made $400,000 in its debut year.

In 2013, Mark Cuban bought a 20% stake in Ten Thirty One Productions for $2 million. From there, new horror-themed attractions popped up in Los Angeles and New York. By the next year, Ten Thirty One Productions earned $3 million, and that has risen to over $5 million.

Chord Buddy – $500,000

A person plays guitar with a Chord Buddy attached.
Six String Lucas/YouTube
Six String Lucas/YouTube

In 2012, Travis Perry invented a way for his daughter to learn guitar easily. Chord Buddy is a device that attaches to a guitar and teaches people four major chords, which make up a large majority of songs.

After earning $150,000 from sales in a single month, Perry took his invention to Shark Tank. Robert Herjevic bought a 20% stake for $175,000. By 2020, Perry sold over $500,000 worth of product. His business is expected to exceed $1 million in the following year.